Improving Your Kitchen’s Energy Efficiency

Making energy-efficient improvements in your home is good for the planet and lowers your utility bills. There are many ways you can improve your energy efficiency without making a considerable investment. This month, we’re going to look at the kitchen specifically.

Most of these improvements will pay for themselves in a matter of years. A professional remodeler can help you determine the best solutions for your home that will give you the highest return on your investment.

Update Your Appliances
Appliance manufacturers have made great strides in energy efficiency over the last decade. If your appliances are more than ten years old, replacing them can significantly lower your energy consumption and utility bills. Kitchen appliances alone can be responsible for more than 30 percent of home energy consumption. Whether you replace some or all of your kitchen appliances, the long-term savings can be considerable—and will vary based on usage and the type of appliance.
Every appliance has a yellow EnergyGuide label applied by the manufacturer that shows its estimated energy usage and operating cost. It also shows how the unit compares to the average cost of similar models. Energy Star-certified appliances can save you even more.

More efficient appliances may have a higher price tag, but most will end up saving you money over time in lower operating costs. Consider how long you plan on staying in the home. We can help you run those numbers to see what makes sense for your home.

It’s also worth asking about other incentives. Many utility companies offer rebates for making the switch to more efficient products, and federal, state, and local tax credits may be available.

Refrigerators and Freezers
Refrigerators and freezers are the most significant users of electricity in the kitchen. According to Energy Star estimates, U.S. consumers are collectively paying an extra $5.5 billion in energy costs because of old, inefficient units.

Refrigerators in the range of 16 to 20 cubic feet are the most efficient. The bigger the unit, the more energy it will use. Some features, like icemakers, will also add to the operating cost. Decide if the tradeoff in convenience and storage makes sense for your budget and family’s needs.
Ovens and Stoves
Gas stoves usually have lower energy costs—if you have a choice. You could also consider an electric induction cooktop if gas is not an option. Other considerations include self-cleaning ovens as they generally have more insulation and hold heat better, while convection ovens use about 20 percent less energy as the fan continually circulates heat.

Energy-efficient models of other appliances, including dishwashers, exhaust fans, and microwave ovens, are also available. We can help you find the best solution for your home.
Consider LED lighting
Another way to lower your energy costs in the kitchen and throughout your house is to look at lighting. In most homes, the kitchen lights are on more than in any other room. Replacing incandescent bulbs with LED bulbs can make a big difference. According to Energy Star, an LED bulb produces light 90 percent more efficiently than an incandescent bulb.

LED bulbs cost more initially but require less energy and last longer than incandescent and fluorescent bulbs. And, unlike fluorescent bulbs, LEDs have the familiar shape of incandescent bulbs and contain no mercury.
Phantom Loads
A phantom load is the electricity a device uses even when it’s turned off and can add up to significant costs over a year. These include popular small kitchen appliances such as toasters, coffee makers, and blenders. In other areas of your home, voice-activated devices continuously draw electricity to listen to your voice commands. Additionally, any device placed into “stand-by mode,” instead of turning off completely, will continue to pull electricity from the grid, even when not operating. These can include computer monitors, printers, TVs, or cable systems. The worst offenders of phantom loads are typically related to entertainment systems: TVs, cable boxes, video game systems, audio systems, phone/device charges. Unplug them when they’re not in use to reduce

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